Teaching about sexual violence in conflicts/emergencies

cerah-sexual-violence-group3For the past year, I’ve been coordinating a series of short courses on sexual violence in conflicts and emergencies. There is a profound stigma around the issue, so I’m pleasantly surprised if you even click on this link and keep reading. If you do, you’ve taken the first step, breaking the internal stigma that makes addressing the problem so difficult.

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Global Fund KPIs: Accountability and the hall of mirrors

img_0591About two weeks ago, the Global Fund Observer, a newsletter that reports on the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, published an article about the Fund’s Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). The article raised concerns about the process of developing the KPIs, citing a letter written by the 10 country and NGO constituencies on the Global Fund Board that implement grants (the “Implementers Group”) to the chairs of the committee that are developing KPI targets.

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Posted in Aid accountability, Data, Health finance, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

You need not die of boredom in Geneva

img_0469Planning a visit to Geneva, Switzerland – for a meeting, business, or to save the broken world?

Many people say Geneva is boring. I know — I used to be one of them. Over the years I’ve found a few places to love.

So grab your tram ticket and start with…

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In 2017, set global health targets from the ground up

grand-anse-beach-040117I’m lucky to be starting 2017 in Grenada, a flawlessly beautiful island nation of just 100,000 people. But Grenada, like many countries, has found it hard to gather basic HIV data in a context where same-sex sexuality and sex work are illegal.

You can circle the whole country in a jeep in one sunny afternoon, as a friend and I did last week, and be greeted warmly everywhere. One local friend says that if he gets a flat tire, at least three people he knows will stop to help. But in part because the country is so close-knit and stigma is deep, many people living with HIV remain hidden, unreached and uncounted.

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Diversity, strength and inclusive health governance: Implementers on the Global Fund Board

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The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria has a uniquely democratic and inclusive model of governance. Half of its Board is made up of 10 constituencies representing 123 countries that receive health financing from the Global Fund, as well as civil society organizations, and networks of communities living with HIV and affected by TB and malaria. Last week, it was my honor to join the Implementers Group of the Board to co-facilitate their annual retreat in Nairobi, Kenya.

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Upcoming event: The Uncounted- Visibility and the Politics of Data in Global Health

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I’m giving a talk on work in progress at New York University next week – please stop by if you’re free.

The Uncounted: Visibility and the Politics of Data in Global Health

October 3, 2016, 3:00pm – 4:30pm

The Kimmel Center for University Life, Room 907
60 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

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Don’t Brexit the AIDS response: The world we come home to from Durban

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The banners are rolled up, the Durban Convention Center floors are swept and the 18,000 delegates to the International AIDS Conference have all gone home. For many, the euphoric week of hugs, protests and panels blew by too fast. As global funding shrinks, there won’t be many more of these massive meetings. That makes it all the more critical to step up investment in and support for civil society now, as the engine that has driven funding, research, science and innovation in the AIDS response. Two recent reports I wrote explore both innovations and the challenges in actually getting the funds to communities.

The first was a report for African Men for Sexual Health and Rights (AMSHeR) on key populations’ engagement with global health financing. I worked at the Global Fund in 2013-15, during roll-out of the “new funding model”, and pushed for space for communities to advocate at the country level as an integral part of that model. So the job of assessing key populations’ satisfication with that experience felt a little like my old Human Rights Watch colleague Marc Garlasco, who did high-value targeting in Iraq for the Pentagon before he went to the war zones for HRW to document civilian casualties caused by the bombs. (Though I hoped that the Global Fund’s “new funding model” had been less damaging than the Iraq invasion.)

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Posted in Aid accountability, Civil society, Human rights impact, Political economy | Leave a comment

Pooh on Brexit

2007-07-18_Warszawa,_ul._Kubusia_Puchatka.jpg“Well, good-bye. I must be going on.” Pooh started to climb out of the hole.

He pulled with his front paws, and pushed with his back paws…and then…

“Oh, help!” said Pooh. “I’d better go back.”

“Oh, bother!” said Pooh. “I shall have to go on.”

“I can’t do either!” said Pooh. “Oh, help and bother!”

“The fact is,” said Rabbit. “You’re stuck.”

“There’s only one thing to be done,” said Christopher Robin. “We shall have to wait for you to get thin again.”

— A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

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Who Pays to Fulfill Health Rights? Aid Eligibility, Accountability and Fiscal Space

Reposted from Health and Human Rights Journal 

Dollarnote_hqNow that members of the UN have adopted the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the next question is: how to pay for it all? The answers raise questions about aid eligibility, transparency and accountability.  Continue reading

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“First they threw Molotov cocktails”: Closing space for LGBT groups

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When you’ve done human rights work for a few years, you think you’re all old and jaded and can no longer be shocked, but it’s not true.

I got reminded of this last month when interviewing Sanjar Kurmanov from lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) group Labrys, based in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. I reached Sanjar while writing a report for Global Philanthropy Project on how government crackdowns on civil society affect LGBT groups (the report launched yesterday and is online here). Continue reading

Posted in Civil society, LGBT | 2 Comments